Schools need to create an environment to help LGBT teachers come out, writes @russellhobby for @tes

School leaders need to support their LGBT staff if they decide to be open, including backing them if parents decide to complain, writes the leader of a heads’ union

Reviewing Stonewall’s latest list of the 100 best employers for lesbian, gay and bisexual staffrecently, I was struck by the fact that although there were a few local authorities and universities, there was no academy chain or federation of schools included.

This led me to think on about the experiences of teachers and school leaders who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), and the challenges that this throws up for our members, as individuals and as employers.

I’m fully aware that many LGBT people don’t feel able to be open about their sexual orientation at work for fear of discrimination, bullying or harassment, and that the issue is even more difficult in schools where concerns about the response of pupils and parents can deter staff from being open.

Read the rest of the article on TES – https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-views/heads-must-have-courage-their-convictions-resist-external-pressures

Homophobic bullying still a problem for LGBT teachers | @NASUWT

LGBT teachers from across the country gathered in Birmingham for the NASUWT’s LGBT Consultation Conference to discuss the challenges facing them as teachers, the impact of the Government’s policies on children and young people and to engage in professional development workshops.

The Conference heard that:

  • more than 60% of LGBT teachers said they have experienced discrimination on the basis of their sexual identity in the course of their teaching careers;
  • over three quarters of LGBT teachers said they had experienced bullying and harassment during their teaching careers;
  • 60% of LGBT teachers said their school has no policy which explicitly opposes homophobia, biphobia and transphobia;
  • two thirds of LGBT teachers said it was not safe for LGBT teachers to be out at work.

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See more about NASUWT’s work for their LGBTI members.